Advanced Imaging

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Archived Webcasts:

Webcast:

Smart Cameras vs. Vision Sensors
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes


Description:

What is a smart camera? In general, it’s considered any camera system that doesn’t use a PC/frame grabber architecture. But there’s much more. Is the smart camera the future or will some applications always demand the more traditional system?

Our experts, Perry West, President of Automated Vision Systems in San Jose, Calif., and David Dechow, of Aptura Machine Vision Solutions in Lansing, Mich., discussed:

  • Pluses and minuses of each
• Suitable applications
• System costs
• How to make an informed decision

 

Webcast:

Machine Vision Professional Webinar:
Reconstructing the 3D Image
Date: September 23, 2010
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes


Description:

In our previous webcast our expert panelists discussed the basics of 3D in machine vision, including how it works, laser triangulation and robot guidance. In this webcast, moderated by Editor-in-Chief Barry Hochfelder, 3D reconstruction—obtaining a 3D surface profile of an object, was discussed.

Our experts, Dr. Heiko Eisele, President of MVTec LLC, in Cambridge, Mass., and Dr. Damion Shelton, CTO and Chief Scientist of threeRivers 3D in Gibsonia, Pa., shared their expertise and answered questions. Their topics included stereo, depth-from-focus, photometric stereo and sheet-of-light (including fixed light-source triangulation and moving line-stripe triangulation.

 

Webcast:

Machine Vision Professional Webinar:
3D – Enter a New Dimension
Date: June 24, 2010
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes


Description:

Machine vision has traditionally been a 2D medium. More and more, however, 3D is beginning to take hold. When is the more complex 3D the right choice? Our expert panel will discuss the benefits and requirements of 3D technology.

Our experts, Heiko Eisle of MVTec and Matt Slaughter of Cyth Systems, will discuss topics such as:

• How does 3D work?
• Laser triangulation for 3D
• How do you get 3D with standard cameras?
• 3D robot guidance

 

Webcast:

Machine Vision Professional Webinar: Data Path
Date: March 25, 2010
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes


Description:

Once you’ve captured the image, what next? As its name implies, data path moves the imaging data in synchronous or asynchronous modes through output protocols such as FireWire, Camera Link, USB and GIG E to displays, storage devices, controllers and web browsers. How do you choose?

Our panel of experts discuss topics such as:

  • What are the differences between interfaces?
  • What are each interface’s strengths and weaknesses?
  • Are there cost considerations?
  • Is one easier to integrate than another?
  • What’s in the future?

 

Webcast:

Image Processing: Crunching data in parallel at high speeds
Date: November 19, 2009
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes


Description:

The Automated Industry Association defines image processing as “transformation of an input image into an output image with desired properties.” It sounds simple, but with data needs growing and processing becoming faster and more powerful, how do you choose between frame grabbers, FPGAs, CPUs and GPUs? 

Our experts, Perry West, President of Automated Vision Systems in San Jose, Calif., and Matthew Slaughter, Business Development Manager, Machine Vision, Cyth Systems in San Diego, Calif., will discuss: 

  • Different processing systems for different applications
  • The benefits of combining Windows, a non-real-time operating system, with a separate real-time system with each running its own core.
  • Using FPGAs because of their versatility and power.
  • High-speed processing
  • CPUs vs. GPUs
  • Data crunching

Webcast:

Image Capture, Part II
Date: September 24, 2009
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes

Description:

In our last webcast, our panel of experts discussed the use of optics and sensors—and how they worked together—in machine vision image capture. In this, the third of four Machine Vision Professional (MVP) webcasts, our panelists will talk about sensors and cameras in various machine vision applications.


Couple of bulleted ‘take-aways’:

  • How to choose a camera and sensor for your application.
  • CCD or CMOS?
  • What about smart cameras?


Webcast:

Capturing the Machine Vision Image
Date: June 18, 2009
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes
Description:

In the first of our four Machine Vision Professional webcasts, our experts discussed the importance of illumination. In the second, on June 18, we'll review image capture with a focus on optics and sensors. We all know the difference between a charge coupled device (CCD) and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), but how do you choose between them for your application? And how do you match your sensor with the lens you've chosen?

This webcast will be moderated by Advanced Imaging's Editor-in-Chief, Barry Hochfelder.

You'll learn:

• How to gain compatibility between the optics and image sensor in your machine vision system.
• How to evaluate your sensors, including dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and low-light sensitivity.
• How to determine which sensor is best for your specific application.
• How to choose a lens based on criteria such as field of view, resolution, distance from target and depth of field.



Webcast:

Shining a Light on Machine Vision
Date: March 26, 2009
Where: Right from your Internet browser
Duration: 60 minutes
Description:

Illumination is a crucial aspect of any machine vision application. New users need to spend time selecting the proper form. Sometimes it's the cheapest and simplest variation, but not always. One expert recommends spending 80 percent of the time on lighting before using an application. Camera, lens and software are important, of course, but proper illumination highlights the target and enables you to get the proper information.

The correct type, whether indirect or dark-field illumination or backlight, among others, is vital to your application. Most people know the different types but not necessarily how to use them. It's not all cut-and-dried, but until they actually test their first choice they won't find out that something may work better for their project.

This webcast will be moderated by Advanced Imaging's Editor-in-Chief, Barry Hochfelder and will focus on:

Numerous forms of lighting, including the traditional default lighting, halogen coupled with fiber optic.

Benefits, drawbacks and limitations of each.

Other forms of lighting our experts will discuss include LEDs, metal halide, xenon and fiber optics, among others, and explain which are best for a number of applications and which to stay away from.

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