Advanced Imaging

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Advanced Imaging Magazine

Updated: January 12th, 2011 09:49 AM CDT

Extreme Design for Extreme Imaging

Rugged components, super-charged processing and ultra-compact form factors are meeting the challenges of imaging in harsh environments
Tapping the space- and energy-savings enabled by 45nm high-end processors, the newest COMs (computer-on-modules) are meeting even higher performance-per-watt standards, making them ideal for imaging environments with high demands on data processing and/or multi-media conversion and output.
Tapping the space- and energy-savings enabled by 45nm high-end processors, the newest COMs (computer-on-modules) are meeting even higher performance-per-watt standards, making them ideal for imaging environments with high demands on data processing and/or multi-media conversion and output.
Challenging remote imaging applications in the medical market are realizing the advantages of the performance, management functionality and high-availability features of MicroTCA.
Challenging remote imaging applications in the medical market are realizing the advantages of the performance, management functionality and high-availability features of MicroTCA.
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By Christine Van De Graaf and David Pursley, Kontron

Two or more processor-based “execution cores” are placed within a single processor to achieve a multicore architecture. This in turn connects directly into a single physical processor socket—however the operating system senses each execution core as a discrete logical processor, each with all the associated execution resources.

More processing can be completed in one clock cycle because the chip’s internal architecture shares the computational work of a single microprocessor between multiple execution cores. Controls that once demanded separate dedicated systems can be integrated into a solitary system – allowing a single computer to handle both control and visualization tasks even for complex and rigorous real-time applications.

Building systems that achieve more for less—more performance per watt, more functionality for less dollar and less physical space—is perhaps the design ideal, and is in turn driving advanced imaging systems much further in what they can do and where they can do it.

45nm Makes All the Difference

Intel’s hafnium-based 45nm high-k metal gate silicon process technology offers just about twice the transistor density when compared to existing 65nm architectures. The result is more than a 20 percent improvement in transistor switching speed, and reduced transistor gate leakage by more than ten-fold.

45nm technology represents Intel’s fastest product ramp in history, and includes single core Intel Atom processors, dual core Intel Core2 Duo processors, Intel Core i7 processors with four cores, and the 6 core Intel Xeon processor. Its relevance to the embedded community has created a smooth and speedy path to Intel’s next micro-architecture—32nm multicore process technology second generation high-k + metal gate transistors. The equivalent oxide thickness of the high-k dielectric has been reduced from 1.0nm on 45nm to 0.9nm on the 32nm process and at the same time, gate length as been reduced down to 30nm. Transistor gate pitch continues to scale 0.7x every two years, and 32nm will provide the tightest gate pitch seen by the industry to date. Since it will use the same basic replacement metal gate process flow as Intel’s 45nm process technology, 32nm production is expected to also ramp very quickly.



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