Advanced Imaging

AdvancedImagingPro.com

   

Advanced Imaging Magazine

Updated: January 12th, 2011 09:49 AM CDT

Watching the Molecules

EMCCD camera lets researchers detect and see things that previously were hard to see
An image of a fibroblast cell triple-stained with DAPI, FITC-Actin and Mito-Tracker. It was taken with the Evolve camera and Olympus DSU confocal by Graham Dellaire, Ph.D., at Nuclear Structure and Cancer Laboratory, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.”
An image of a fibroblast cell triple-stained with DAPI, FITC-Actin and Mito-Tracker. It was taken with the Evolve camera and Olympus DSU confocal by Graham Dellaire, Ph.D., at Nuclear Structure and Cancer Laboratory, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.”
Photometrics Evolve electron multiplying (EMCCD) cameras enable researchers to detect things in a more realistic and native form in live cell research.
Photometrics
Photometrics Evolve electron multiplying (EMCCD) cameras enable researchers to detect things in a more realistic and native form in live cell research.
Advertisement

By Barry Hochfelder

Photometrics says the Evolve is the first camera to make experimental imaging data quantifiable and reproducible by using the photoelectron to scientifically measure an image. Earlier scientific-grade CCD cameras provided data in arbitrary imaging units, making it time consuming and challenging to reproduce study results. Evolve’s Quant-View feature, provides a repeatable methodology to gather and interpret data by reading out pixel values in photoelectrons. Researchers can ensure their experimental data are well-controlled and consistent, as well as reproducible within and across labs.

“Scientific research is often hindered by conflicting data and inconsistent data measurement, resulting in delays, loss of funding and disputable study outcomes,” Sharma says. “With the Evolve camera, researchers can now attain the purest measurement of a scientific image, which is crucial considering the growing popularity of ultra-quantitative techniques such as PALM (Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy) and STORM (Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy) where certainty of measurement is essential.”

Scientists should be thrilled with the technology, especially having a camera that does the precise measurements for them. “These guys are not technologists,” Sharma says. “The users are biologists. They’re worried about the genes that are causing disease. They’re worrying about keeping their cells alive for a long time. They’re worrying about all the stuff that they’re trained in, so they don’t understand the technology core. There was a gap there that was not being fulfilled which was actually, I think, costing research time, costing NIH funding research, money, and costing us all so much [because] we weren’t doing as effective an amount of science as we could be doing.”

If you have questions on this or any other story, please contact Editor Barry Hochfelder at barry.hochfelder@cygnuspub.com.
We cannot reply to individuals, but selected questions will be posted at www.advancedimagingpro.com.



Subscribe to our RSS Feeds