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Advanced Imaging Magazine

Updated: January 12th, 2011 10:01 AM CDT

High Def in the Lab

High-definition microscopy imaging solutions for diagnostics and teaching
Figure 1
© Toshiba Imaging
Figure 1: Single-chip area scan cameras use a single sensor that is covered by a color filter with a fixed, repetitive pattern. To reconstruct a complete color image, interpolation is needed. The red, green and blue information is interpolated across several adjacent cells to determine the total color content of each individual cell, therefore providing less color accuracy than 3CCD.
Figure 2
Toshiba Imaging
Figure 2: Three-chip cameras contain three separate image sensors and a prism that divides the incoming light rays into their red, green and blue components. Each individual chip then receives a single color at full resolution, therefore providing the best color accuracy available.
Synergy HD Microscopy System with 47-inch LCD display.
Toshiba Imaging
Synergy HD Microscopy System with 47-inch LCD display.
Toshiba Imaging's IK-HD1 camera.
© Toshiba Imaging
Toshiba Imaging's IK-HD1 camera.
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By Gary Pitre, Toshiba Imaging Systems Division

HIGH DEF 3CCD AND OPTIMIZED OPTICS

When searching for cancerous cells by way of shape, size and color, precise and true color image reproduction is critical. Olympus has developed microscopy optics that are compatible with digital imaging, using the 3CCD technology to divide the incoming light and route it to red, green and blue CCD imagers. This ensures that each color is captured at full, HD resolution. A group of physicians and/or clinicians now can gather together to view and discuss live tissue imagery with precision color reproduction on a high-def display.

According to Tedd Kelemen of Olympus Canada, "Changing magnifications 'on the fly' and moving pathology slides around while the groups of physicians and/or students are looking on, is a breakthrough in this industry. With the new HD format, the microscopy system offers exceptional detail, contrast and brightness even at low 2X / 4X magnifications where screening and margins are discussed. The new LCD HD display is rapidly becoming the preferred diagnostic method for many pathologists who have tested it. The new system allows multiple people in the same room to view microscopic or macroscopic images together, in real time, at the same speed, with the same brightness and contrast. In a clinical environment, it gives doctors the ability to see the image on a large format screen and discuss the attributes of a uniform image. This leads to better communication and interaction of medical professionals and, ultimately, to better care for the patient."

The color fidelity and image clarity notwithstanding, Olympus' Synergy HD Imaging System is also less tiresome for the clinician than viewing slides through the binoculars of the microscope, and it is much easier to confer with colleagues while simultaneously viewing the slides. The LCD displays also can be strategically placed in a large classroom or auditorium, so everyone present can view the tissue samples for analysis and diagnosis. The new microscopy system also is capable of more advanced imaging techniques, such as fluorescence and polarized light.

The new system was recently used with DAPI fluorescent staining technique (which binds strongly to DNA). The pathologists involved were able to easily agree upon a diagnosis based on what they saw on the high definition screen. This remarkable advancement in imaging technology will allow doctors and others to collectively agree on the best form of treatment and, in the end, greatly improve patient care.

Gary Pitre is Eastern Regional Sales Manager, Imaging Systems Division, of Toshiba America Information Systems, Irvine, Calif. He can be reached at gary.pitre@tais.toshiba.com. He wishes to acknowledge Tedd Kelemen, Olympus Canada (Markham, Ontario), for his assistance. Kelemen can be reached at Tedd.Kelemen@olympus.com.



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